70th anniversary of the Korean War

Napalm bombs dropped by U.S. B-52 bombers on north Korea.

Seventy years ago, on June 25, 1950, U.S. imperialism used the United Nations as a cover to launch a genocidal war to prevent the liberation of the Korean peninsula and to invade socialist China.

In the Fatherland Liberation War (known as the Korean War in the West), the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, led by Kim Il Sung and the Workers’ Party of Korea, was able to beat back the U.S. invasion to the 38th parallel with the help of Chinese volunteers and Soviet material assistance.

The human toll was enormous. U.S. and puppet forces carried out massacres of civilians suspected of sympathizing with the socialist north. Twenty percent of the population in the north were killed. Every building above one story in the north was destroyed by U.S. bombs, as was the country’s industrial and agricultural infrastructure. 

The Korean people in the north had to rebuild their country from the ground up. Today, thanks to a planned economy and the political mobilization of its people, the DPRK is a strong socialist country that is able to defend itself and its neighbors from U.S. aggression.

Although an armistice was signed in 1953, the U.S. government still refuses to sign a treaty officially ending the war. The Pentagon continues to illegally occupy south Korea on behalf of Wall Street, using it as a base for subversion and military aggression throughout the region. But none of this has blunted the desire of the Koren people, north and south, for peaceful reunification.

Hands off the DPRK!
U.S. out of Korea!
Korea is one!

Poster from 1951: ‘Long live the victory of the Korean People’s Army and the Chinese People’s Volunteers Army!’